NAVIGATION

NAVIGATION

Vesak | Youth Leadership Workshop - Melbourne Town Hall, Saturday 23 May 2015 @ 9.30am-12 noon

Living in the 21st Century: Rewriting the Future of Your Life

[Edited extract from public address]

The world all-around you may be in crisis, but you don’t have to be. You can learn to bounce back, find deeper meaning in life, and revive your mind and body.

A unique and valuable opportunity for participants 18–30 years of age to experience a Youth Leadership workshop conducted by Senior Nun Chang Ji of Dharma Drum Mountain Buddhist Association, USA

Venerable Chang Ji is an ordained nun in the Chinese Mahayana tradition of Buddhism since 2004 under Dharma Drum Mountain. In her role as the International Affairs Special Assistant to the late Most Venerable Master Sheng Yen, founder of Dharma Drum Mountain Buddhist Association, she participated in many international conferences, including the World Economic Forum, World Bank, as well as meetings at the United Nations, etc.

Venerable Chang Ji is committed to teaching the tenets of contemplative action to young adults worldwide and has led many youth leadership workshops and meditation retreats to this effect. She has been a facilitator in programs for young leaders in conflict and post-conflict areas from Iraq, Afghanistan, Sudan and Cambodia, and works to spread awareness of Spiritual Environmentalism as taught by her teacher, the late Most Venerable Master Sheng Yen to young people all over the world.

The workshop will cover: 
1. Being - Who Am I?
2. Knowing - Inner knowing, social injustice, external knowing, integrating both to find your vision
3. Doing - Where and how change happens

The workshop will be held as part of the Victorian United Nations Day of Vesak 2015.

Registration/Inquiries:
Please email wbu@bdcu.org.au. (Early registration is recommended as workshop places are limited).

MORE:
VICTORIAN OBSERVANCE OF THE UNITED NATIONS DAY OF VESAK
Victoria's Buddhist Community Celebrating Together
2015 Organising Committee
Website: www.unvesak.org
Email: unvesakmelb@gmail.com
Tel: (03) 9754 3334
Fax: (03) 9754 3334



ASRC | Asylum Seeker Resource Centre - May 2015


Edited extract of April public address]

For those with a surplus, 
Foodbank is in need of:
-- Tinned Salmon and Sardines
-- Shaving item
-- Honey
Material Aid is in need of:
-- Coats
-- Blankets
-- Beanies & scarves
For a full list of needs, visit here http://www.asrc.org.au/home/our-services/how-we-help/aid/food-and-aid-network/

Did you know of benefits to your place from engaging socially enterprising ASRC Catering or  ASRC Cleaning?

MORE:

Asylum Seeker Resource Centre
214-218 Nicholson St
Footscray
Melbourne, VIC 3011 Australia
Web: www.asrc.org.au

NRW | National Reconciliation Week - 27 May-3 June 2015

[Edited extract of public address]

National Reconciliation Week (NRW) is celebrated across Australia each year between 27 May and 3 June. The dates commemorate two significant milestones in the reconciliation journey - the anniversaries of the successful 1967 referendum and the High Court Mabo decision.

The week is a time for all Australians to learn about our shared histories, cultures and achievements and to explore how each of us can join the national reconciliation effort.

Events held nationally, check online for events held nearest you.

MORE:

Reconciliation Australia
Old Parliament
House, King George Terrace, Parkes ACT
PO Box 4773, Kingston ACT 2604
ABN 76 092 919 769
Tel: 02 6273 9200
Fax: 02 6273 9201
Email: enquiries@reconciliation.org.au


NRW | The Long Walk - Saturday, 30 May 2015, 12 noon-6pm

[Edited extract from public address]

Federation Square, Corner Swanston & Flinders Streets Melbourne VIC 3000, Melbourne

Come TOGETHER for free fun family activities, workshops, community stalls and food vendors. Sing and dance TOGETHER with performances by some of Australia's best entertainers.

Then walk TOGETHER with Michael Long for the annual walk to the 'G for the Dreamtime AFL game.

MORE:

The Long Walk
Nicole Caulfield
Tel: 03 8340 2172
Email: education@thelongwalk.com.au
Web: http://thelongwalk.com.au/

NRW | Murrumbeena Celebration Day of National Reconciliation Week - Sunday 31 May, 12-3pm

Join your local community in an afternoon of celebration.

Mallanbool Reserve, Corner Leila and Murrumbeena Roads, Murrumbeena
(Melway 68 K8)

Program includes:
  • Welcome to Country and Smoking Ceremony
  • Indigenous dance workshop
  • Bush tucker BBQ
  • Guided tours of natural flora and fauna with cultural and historical insights.
Reconciliation: It's time to change it up!
MORE:

Glen Eira City Council
Tori Hayat
Tel: 03 9524 3371
Email: thayat@gleneira.vic.gov.au

Follow Glen Eira Arts and Culture on facebook www.facebook.com/gleneiraarts

PWR | Homelessness: How Can We Help?


[Edited extract from public address]

Homelessness remains a pressing issue. 

In America, according to the most recent data available, at least 100 million people around the globe are considered homeless. More than 3.5 million people residing in the United States are homeless and 25% are under the age of 18. Whereas homelessness is rooted in poverty in countries like India, Nigeria, and France, the U.S. has seen an increase in homelessness due to a variety of factors. They include – but are not limited to – veterans returning from armed conflict overseas, the 2007 housing crisis which left thousands of families without homes, and those suffering from mental illness without access to housing and necessary treatment.

Homeless prevention legislation in America has yielded mixed results. Cook County (IL) Sheriff Tom Dart halted foreclosure-based evictions during the winter of 2008 to protect rent-paying tenants, consequently compounding problems by making lenders less likely to extend loan payments to the most vulnerable.

In Salt Lake City, Utah, an alternative method was employed. The city provided its chronically homeless individuals with housing and counseling, saving the state an average of $8,000 per homeless person. By utilizing this program model, homelessness in Salt Lake decreased by 72% between 2005 to 2014.

In other states, some governments are criminalizing the homeless by passing reactive legislation. The cost of enforcing the criminalization of homelessness costs more than housing the homeless. The practice spars public outcry because it is ultimately worsening the situation. This is why community groups and interfaith leaders are stepping in to help fill the gaps.

Interfaith groups have provided social services to assist the homeless through food banks and food drives, soup kitchens, shelters, and even counseling and rehabilitation. In order to address the issue proactively, interfaith groups are now also working to prevent homelessness. An interfaith group in St. Petersburg, Florida is finally able to launch a rotating shelter for homeless families after establishing the program within the last several years. In Fayetteville, North Carolina, community leaders held a forum between the homeless community and residents that want to help them. By opening the dialogue in this manner, both homeless advocates and those they serve have a voice.

Without discussion and brainstorming, problems like homelessness cannot be successfully addressed. In 2014, the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs donated $3 million to Interfaith Community Services to further the organization’s mission of erasing veteran homelessness. Right now, an Interfaith Resource Center is planning the construction of a year-round overnight shelter for the homeless in Columbia, Missouri. Additionally, a couple in Athens, Georgia is hosting a week of fun activities and learning opportunities to help raise funds for Interfaith Hospitality Network Athens, a nonprofit organization that assists the homeless.

Helping the homeless remains a major priority for faith communities. Although homelessness may continue to be a problem in the future, the call to “live compassionately,” as Karen Armstrong says, means one should remain uncomfortable so long as his or her fellow brother or sister is suffering. Interfaith cooperation can achieve a sharp reduction in homelessness if communities continue to think and act together. All faith traditions are called to serve the needy in their doctrines and teachings. Presently, tracking homelessness remains a challenge for agencies and governments. But with the assistance of faith communities’ cooperation, effective and innovative models for eradicating homelessness can be implemented.


Parliament Staff including interns Shani Belshaw, Nafia Khan, and Daniel Wolff contributed to this article.




MORE: Council for a Parliament of the World's Religions
70 East Lake Street, Suite 205
Chicago, IL 60601 USA
Tel: 312-629-2990
Fax: 312-629-2991
Email: 2015@parliamentofreligions.org

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PWR | Reflections from Rosebud Reservation

[Edited extract from public address]

In the week ending 24 April 2015, Parliament Ambassador Aamir Hussain writes "I joined 11 other medical students from the University of Chicago in volunteering at a Lakota Native American reservation in Rosebud, South Dakota. We spent some of our time volunteering with Habitat for Humanity, and some time shadowing physicians at the local Indian Health Service (IHS) hospital. This experience was a great opportunity to not only learn about health care challenges on reservations, but also to reflect on the intersections between religion, service, and medicine.

Aside from astronomically high rates of chronic conditions such as Type II Diabetes, obesity, depression, and alcoholism, patients at the IHS clinic often lack access to cancer screenings because the small facility does not have the resources to provide those services. As a result, it is not uncommon for treatable conditions to cause life-threatening complications. I was shocked to learn that some patients suffered from tuberculosis, a disease that I thought had been mostly eliminated from the United States. Finally, patients routinely resort to using the emergency room often need to be air-evacuated to other hospitals for minor complaints that cannot be addressed on the reservation.

However, there were also several positive aspects of the IHS. First, The primary care doctors I shadowed were able to spend lots of time with her patients, talking through diagnoses and medications at length. Second, the reservation community was very close-knit, and physicians (even those who lived outside the reservation) were well-acquainted with Lakota traditions and had a strong desire to be part of the local culture. Finally, although the IHS is woefully under-funded (annual health spending per person for the overall U.S. population is over $9000, in comparison to about $2400 per person in the IHS), it is still a single-payer system that guarantees coverage to all Native Americans with documented membership in a federally-recognized tribe. Although IHS insurance may be less effective outside IHS facilities, this federal program ensures that virtually everyone on the reservation is insured.

While learning about Lakota history, I was intrigued by the changing roles of religious groups over time. Until the mid-20th century, many Western churches saw the Native Americans as “savages,” and many priests sought to “educate” the Lakota in such a way that they would forget their old ways and completely adopt Western customs. Fortunately, there now seems to be more mutual understanding between different spiritual traditions. Christian institutions provide a large number of social services, and serve as community centers for various activities. Churches and religious leaders now run many charities, including the local chapter of Habitat for Humanity. However, many Lakota traditions such as sweat lodges, vision quests, and Sun Dances are also practiced, and some reservation residents observe Christianity alongside the traditional Lakota religion.

Indeed, I was struck by the contrast between hopelessness and optimism on the reservation. On one hand, unemployment is well over 70 percent, the life expectancy can be less than 50 years, suicide rates are extremely high, and families are often trapped in cyclical poverty. On the other hand, reservation residents speak fondly of Sinte Gleska, an accredited Lakota university that provides a wide array of degrees, and cheer for their young students who have won full scholarships to major national universities like Stanford and Dartmouth. Others express hope for the in-progress Crazy Horse Memorial, and how it can someday stand as a symbol of the unvanquished Native American spirit for generations to come.

Through my conversations with the people of Rosebud, I was constantly reminded of a verse from the Quran that speaks of resilience: “Verily, with every difficulty there [comes] relief” (Quran 94:6). Throughout my life as practicing Muslim, I always took this verse for granted; whenever I struggled with something, I found comfort in the fact that relief would eventually come. However, this past week has shown me that for many people, hardship can often be followed by an even greater hardship. Finding any “relief” can be very difficult, and it can be tough to persevere when faced with such overwhelming odds.

I have been inspired by the various people I have met on this short trip, from the recent high school graduate who strives to learn at least “one new fact” every day and someday teach English abroad, to the tireless educator at Sinte Gleska University who motivates her students to follow their dreams, to the hospital worker who speaks fluent Lakota with local elders, keeping an ancient language alive.

These friends I made, and many others, illustrate my religion’s core tenets of humility, service, resilience, and community engagement. As a result, I have become more motivated to reflect on my own practice of Islam, and will strive to exhibit those virtues throughout my medical career.

Before we left to return to Chicago, our Rosebud host told us, “It doesn’t matter if you never return here. Just promise me this: never forget us, and never forget what you learned here.”

That is a promise I intend to keep."

Aamir Hussain
Parliament Ambassador
[Originally published on Huffington Post. Full article with images at PWR http://www.parliamentofreligions.org/news/index.php/2015/04/reflections-from-rosebud-reservation/]




MORE: Council for a Parliament of the World's Religions
70 East Lake Street, Suite 205
Chicago, IL 60601 USA
Tel: 312-629-2990
Fax: 312-629-2991
Email: 2015@parliamentofreligions.org

SUBSCRIBE TO THE FREE NEWSLETTER: Check out the latest edition here and, if you would like to receive, scroll down to the bottom for subscription options.

ONLINE REGISTRATION: 



PWR | Secretary-General Urges World to Unite against Extremism at General Assembly Thematic Debate on Promoting Tolerance, Reconciliation

[Edited extract from public address]

United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon called on faith leaders from around the world to use their wisdom and leadership to counter the forces of radicalization and intolerance and to stand up to promote dialogue and mutual understanding.

Addressing religious leaders gathered in the General Assembly on the second day of the two-day thematic debate on “Promoting Tolerance and Reconciliation: Fostering Peaceful, Inclusive Societies and Countering Violent Extremism”, Mr. Ban said he was troubled by an “empathy gap” in the world today.  “People are turning their eyes from what is happening to others.”

The Secretary-General warned that the values, enshrined in the United Nations Charter, of dignity and worth of the human person, equal rights of men and women, tolerance and living together in peace and harmony were under siege.

Noting that this year marked the seventieth anniversary of the United Nations, Mr. Ban said:  “Our values are held in contempt by terrorists and violent extremists bent on imposing their warped visions and bankrupt ideologies.  Violent extremism is not a North-South or East-West issue.  It is not confined to a particular region or religion.  It transcends borders and exists across the world.  Religion does not cause violence; people do.”  

The thematic debate brought together Government officials from 63 Member States, along with faith leaders and academics representing Buddhism, Christianity, Hinduism, Islam, Judaism and Sikhism.  The gathering, organized by General Assembly President Sam Kutesa in conjunction with the Secretary-General and the United Nations Alliance of Civilizations, aimed at discussing practical strategies to counter the rise of intolerance and violent extremism.  It also provided a platform for religious leaders to promote dialogue and respect for human rights while looking at how diverse faith communities can address common challenges.

“Today, we see violent extremism most vividly in the atrocities committed by Da’esh, Boko Haram, Al-Shabaab, Al-Qaida and other sectarian and terrorist groups,” Mr. Ban said, adding that it was also evident in racist acts and hate speech.  “Prejudice against those of another faith, history or culture is always toxic,” he said, noting that the global response to violent extremism needed to look at the root causes of the problem and factors that enabled extremists to gain new recruits.

Raising the question about the attraction of extremist ideologies, he said most of those recruited by violent extremists were young men, although women were also falling under the influence.  Many were frustrated with the few avenues available to them to pursue productive lives and find their place in society.  “We must show them another way, a better way.  That includes working to end poverty, inequality and lack of opportunity”.

The Secretary-General announced that he would form an advisory panel of religious leaders to promote interfaith dialogue and would present a comprehensive plan of action on preventing violent extremism to the seventieth session of the General Assembly later this year.

As out of the world’s 7 billion people, more than 5 billion identify themselves as members of religious communities, religious leaders and educators can play an important role in teaching their followers the correct meaning of mutual understanding and respecting the other’s faith.

“We expect our religious leaders to be brave and to teach their followers when they see something morally wrong.  I ask you, too, to do more to amplify the voice of the moderate majority so we may drown out those who preach violence and hatred,” Mr. Ban told the meeting, which concluded today.

Speaking to reporters afterwards, the Secretary-General urged the international community to come together to combat violent extremism.  “The world must unite against extremism.  We must get at the roots of what fuels it,” he stated.

Also addressing reporters, Mr. Kutesa pointed out that 2015 has been so far a challenging year around the world.  “Almost everywhere, people, communities and nations are grappling with a disquieting rise of radicalization and violent extremism.  From Paris to Tunis; from Garissa to Yarmouk; from Johannesburg to Peshawar; no person, society or nation is immune from intolerance and the threat of terrorism or violent extremism.”

“There is no justification for such attacks,” he stressed.  We must condemn all manifestations of intolerance, including anti-Semitism, Islamophobia, xenophobia and racism.”

He further told reporters “enough is enough.  The course of violence must be curbed.  Let us defeat obscurantism.”  All were here today to create a more tolerant, peaceful world, he added.


Ban Ki-moon 
Secretary-General, United Nations




MORE: Council for a Parliament of the World's Religions
70 East Lake Street, Suite 205
Chicago, IL 60601 USA
Tel: 312-629-2990
Fax: 312-629-2991
Email: 2015@parliamentofreligions.org

SUBSCRIBE TO THE FREE NEWSLETTER: Check out the latest edition here and, if you would like to receive, scroll down to the bottom for subscription options.

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Glen Eira Annual Celebration of Interconnectedness - Saturday 16 May 2014 @ 5.30pm

Come to a casual small sit-down celebration over agreeable food and agreeable company. Advise if bringing companion(s) for seating allocation.

What: Interconnectedness is a Buddha's teaching that explains how what we experience in the present has no beginning and the future has unlimited possibilities. Its a matter of view, choice, and action in this moment, that benefits ourselves increasing in beneficiaries until it includes all.

Where: Elsternwick location
Why: Experience a little Interconnectedness of all things. Event is a speech-free zone and there will be a short blessing before the meal. Unofficial fundraiser for Asylum Seeker Resource Centre
Cost: inspiring meal provided, feel welcome to forego a usual "thing" this night/week and instead make a donation on night or direct to Asylum Seeker Resource Centre http://www.asrc.org.au/programs/
RSVP: by 5.30 pm Friday 15 May 2015 to Carey, Mob: 0438 371 488 or Email: carey@caro.com.au

MORE: 

Caro on behalf of Glen Eira interfaith activity

PWR | Parliament of the World's Religions - Salt Lake City, 15-19 October 2015

[edited extract of public addresses]

From the Desk of the Board Chair of the Parliament

The news from the interfaith movement across the globe is increasingly positive and ever more promising. And I am extremely pleased and proud that the Parliament of the World’s Religions is at the very center of this historic movement that is building momentum day by day.

Let me explain. The interfaith movement has tripled in size over the last decade. With that growth comes responsibility to be organizationally stronger and well-positioned for the role we are to play in human affairs. That involves developing measurable goals and demonstrating achievements both in mutual understanding and cooperation among faith communities as well as creating a more just, peaceful, and sustainable world. Our fiscal foundation for this kind of work must also be stronger if the Parliament and the interfaith movement it is leading is to realize its promise.

Abdul Malik Mujahid
Chair
Board of Trustees

P.S. There are six major exciting announcements that are coming about at the Parliament which we will share with you soon, God willing, one at a time. 

Read full address here:

Celebrating World Bank's Faith Partnership to End Extreme Poverty

More than 30 religious leaders and faith-based organizations have endorsed the World Bank's call for ending extreme poverty. The statement explains the moral obligation shared between faith communities to end the systems which create extreme poverty.

“When we in the interfaith movement commit our faith and action with the will to make it happen, incredible progress is possible,” says Parliament's Executive Director Dr. Mary Nelson. "We fully endorse the moral imperative, and welcome the opportunity to work with the World Bank, the United Nations, and other international partners to relieve more than 1.2 billion people currently living in extreme poverty."

“Poverty is a moral issue. The 2015 Parliament will have a special track on the widening wealth gap and income inequity,” says Imam Abdul Malik Mujahid, Parliament Board Chair. Mujahid continues, “We will invite the 10,000 participants of 80 countries and 50 religious and spiritual traditions of the 2015 Parliament to make a commitment to engage the guiding institutions of their respective countries to make extreme poverty a thing of the past through changes in public policy, and to facilitate a balanced relationship between labor and capital to achieve just distribution of wealth.”

Read more about the full release here:
http://www.parliamentofreligions.org/news/index.php/2015/04/the-parliament-of-the-worlds-religions-celebrates-the-world-bank-partnership-with-faith-communities-to-end-extreme-poverty-by-2030?mc_cid=bda2f261d3&mc_eid=432c1b1ac4

From the outgoing Executive Director

In the meantime, it would be a good resolution for 2015 for each of us to commit to do something with and for young people—providing alternatives to violence, showing there is another way, joining others to open up doors of opportunity for better education, ensuring that each child has possibilities for a future with hope.
Dr. Mary Nelson, outgoing Executive Director, 2015 Parliament of the World's Religions, Salt Lake City, USA





MORE: Council for a Parliament of the World's Religions
70 East Lake Street, Suite 205
Chicago, IL 60601 USA
Tel: 312-629-2990
Fax: 312-629-2991
Email: 2015@parliamentofreligions.org
Web: http://www.parliamentofreligions.org/

SUBSCRIBE TO THE FREE NEWSLETTER: Check out the latest edition here and, if you would like to receive, scroll down to the bottom for subscription options.
http://us1.campaign-archive1.com/?u=15d4f7de1064a5171ce87bc0e&id=bda2f261d3&e=432c1b1ac4

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2015 Parliament Header

Asylum Seeker Resource Centre - April 2015

[Edited extract of April public address]

For those with a surplus, 
Foodbank is in need of:
-- Toothpaste
-- Biscuits
-- Dried fruit & nuts
Material Aid is in need of:
-- Coats
-- Blankets
-- Beanies & scarves
For a full list of needs, visit here

Did you know of benefits to your place from engaging socially enterprising ASRC Catering or  ASRC Cleaning?

MORE: 

Asylum Seeker Resource Centre
214-218 Nicholson St
Footscray
Melbourne, VIC 3011 Australia
Web: www.asrc.org.au

Vibrant Balaclava multicultural celebration - Sunday 19 April 2015, 10.30-2.30pm

Carlisle St, Balaclava

If you are looking for something to do Sunday 19th, join Balaclavans for a line up of fantastic musicians, great food, a short-film screening and art activities for the kids including a drumming workshop.

If you don't know Carlisle St already, locals feel it's the brunch capital of Melbourne with loads of hip caf├ęs and bars to wander between so round up a group of friends and come on down.

MORE:
A Vibrant Villages initiative supported by Multicultural Arts Victoria
http://www.portphillip.vic.gov.au/vibrant-balaclava.htm

Vesak | Victorian United Nations Victorian Day of Vesak - Saturday 23 May 2015, 10am-4pm

A combined Victorian Buddhist Multi-Cultural Melbourne CBD event open to all

For the eighth consecutive year in a row, Victorians will observe the United Nations Day of Vesak, marking the start of a month when Buddhist communities globally come together to celebrate Vesak, the birth, passing and enlightenment of the Buddha.

Buddhism spans cultural groups such as Chinese, Taiwanese, Malaysian, Indonesian, Cambodian, Vietnamese, Loation, Thai, Mongolian, Tibetan, Burmese, Korean, Japanese, Indian, Sri Lankan, to name a few. Buddhism has a strong history in Victoria since the goldrush days in 1848 and continues today with unique representation of many cultural groups and traditions and forms practiced in Melbourne and around the state.

Join us in celebration at the BIGGEST event in the Buddhist Calendar!
Vesak Celebrations include:
-- Sangha Lunch Offering
-- Vesak Procession in the heart of Melbourne CBD
-- Buddhist Youth Leadership Workshop
-- Blessings and Chanting from various Buddhist traditions
-- Multi-Cultural Performances
-- Musical stage production

Sangha Lunch Offering: starts 10.00am at the St Peter’s Parish Hall, 15 Gisborne Street, East Melbourne

Vesak Procession: starts 1.00pm from Parliament Gardens, (assemble from 12.15pm) 489-531 Albert Street (corner of Nicholson & Albert Streets) East Melbourne to Melbourne Town Hall.
(Public carparking available nearby)
* Lunch packs provided

Vesak Celebrations: starts 1.30pm to 4.00pm at the Melbourne Town Hall (corner Swanston & Collins St)

Cost: Free event - all welcome

Organisers acknowledge meaningful support by Victorian Multicultural Commission, City of Melbourne and the Victorian Buddhist Community.

MORE: 

For the latest updates from organisers, please visit the official website: www.unvesak.org

Acknowledgment

In these busy modern times, sometimes it is easy to forget to say thank you.

We acknowledge traditional inhabitants of Glen Eira and surrounds are Wurundjeri of the Kulin Nation. Respect is offered to past, present and future elders of all spiritual traditions. May we find a generous way to accommodate those seeking refuge. Let us be cool and strive individually and together to overcome inequality, violence, disengagement, tragedy and injustice wherever it may be. Let us honour, savor and enjoy results of mindful effort so more thrive peacefully in our place called home.

Ardoch Literacy Buddies

Ardoch's Literacy Buddies involves a class of primary school students (approximately 25 'Little Buddies') and their workplace volunteer "Big Buddies" exchanging monthly letter. The goal of this pen-pal program is to encourage students to read and write, provide meaningful interactions with working adult role models and to expose students to different career aspirations.

In 2014, 55 programs took place in Melbourne, Sydney, Brisbane and Perth. During the year, many Buddies get to meet face to face at a mid-year visit at school and at end of year visit at Big Buddies' workplace.

To meet growing demand, more business Big Buddy workplaces are needed.

MORE:

Ardoch Youth Foundation
Danielle Griffin
Tel: 03 9537 2414
Web: https://www.ardoch.asn.au/

My Brother Jack Awards 2015

Short Story, Poetry and Photography Competition 


Who: Open to people who live, work or study in Glen Eira
Categories: Writing: Primary, Junior Secondary, Senior Secondary, Open. Photography: Open
Entries Close: Monday 27 April, 5pm

MORE:

Glen Eira City Council
Web: www.gleneira.vic.gov.au/MBJ
Tel: 9524 3333

Glen Eira Community Grants Program 2015-2016

Applications close Friday 24 April 2015

[edited extract of public address]

Each year, Council awards grants in six categories:
-- public health and wellbeing;
-- Families, youth and children;
-- Sports and recreation;
-- Active senior citizens;
-- Environmental sustainability; and Arts and culture

Grants upto $7,500 for not-for-profit groups to implement projects and activities benefitting Glen Eira. Previous year's grants totaled $350,000.

MORE: 

Glen Eira City Council's Community Development Officer, Council Service Centre
Tel: 9524 3333
Web: www.gleneira.vic.gov.au

RISE: Refugee Survivors and Ex-detainees

[edited extract of public address]

RISE is a unique organisation governed by refugees, asylum seekers, and ex-detainees to enable refugees to build new lives by providing advice, engaging in community development, enhancing opportunity, and campaigning for refugee rights.

There are many ways to strengthen diverse community, here are 3 of them:

1. Volunteers Needed for Tutoring program

EAL (English as Another Language) Teachers and or uni students studying Bachelor of Teaching from POC backgrounds to volunteer at our tutoring program every Saturdays including one person to teach EAL for students with special needs.

2. Interested but not EAL qualified? 

Please contact as inclusion might be possible through support programs such as a homework helper!

3. Donations

Donations assist our dedicated volunteers to provide services directly to refugees children, adults and entire families.
To donate to RISE visit: http://www.givenow.com.au/riserefugee

We encourage you to get involved with our organisation and if you believe in community development and the power of people, then you understand the way we work. You understand how lives can be enriched and you know how they can be changed for the better. With your help, we can build a better and stronger future for all.

Please pass this notice onto anyone you think may be interested in applying. It's a wonderful feeling to give some time to help a young person to acquire communication skills.

Regards,
Ramesh Fernandez
CEO & Founder

MORE: 

RISE: Refugee Survivors and Ex-detainees
Level 1, Ross House 247 Flinders Lane, Melbourne, Victoria 3000
Tel: (03) 9639 8623
Mobile: 0430 007 586
Fax: (03) 9650 3689
Web: www.riserefugee.org/

RISE acknowledges that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples are original owners and custodians of the land we live and work on.

Asylum Seeker Resource Centre

[Edited extract of public address]

For those with a surplus:

Foodbank is in need of:
-- Toothpaste
-- Biscuits
-- Dried fruit & nuts
Material Aid is in need of:
-- Coats
-- Blankets
-- Beanies & scarves
For a full list of needs, click here.

Did you know of benefits to your place from engaging socially enterprising ASRC Catering or ASRC Cleaning?

MORE: 

Asylum Seeker Resource Centre
214-218 Nicholson St
Footscray
Melbourne, VIC 3011 Australia
Web: www.asrc.org.au