AIS | TALK | Islam in a Secular Society: Individualism vs Communitarianism | Tuesday 31 July 2018 | 6-8pm

[Edited extract from public address]

In an era in which faith traditions are encouraged to be relevant and provide meaning to their adherents, one faith tradition has been subjected to more scrutiny than others.

Islam, a civilization that has contributed to the advancement of humanity, has been put under the microscope ever since 9/11. Muslims have been asked to explain the true teachings of their faith and clarify many aspects of it that seem puzzling to the neutral eye.

Many Muslims are now living as citizens in Western secular societies such as Australia, where there is a separation of religion from the state. These societies are liberal and promote individual rights: the rights to belief and non-belief, freedom of thought, equal treatment of women, socially and economically to name a few. In this setting, can a Muslim truly be a part of society, or are there faith-based beliefs preventing this? Are there any clashes with Islamic teachings which curb an individual’s rights of belief, non-belief and having unlimited freedom of speech?

Hear panellists Hana Assafiri, Meredith Doig, Paul Monk, Mehmet Ozalp address these topics and more. Moderated by the former Religion Editor of The Age newspaper Mr Barney Zwartz

Where: Australian Intercultural Society, Ground Floor, Suite 2, 441 St Kilda Rd, Melbourne VIC 3004

Considerations: Light refreshments with tea & coffee will be offered. If you have any special dietary needs, please let us know when you register for the event.

Bookings: Online through EventBrite

MORE:
Australian Intercultural Society
Address: 441 St Kilda Rd, Ground Floor Suite 2, Melbourne VIC 3004
Tel: 03 9867 2248
Email: info@intercultural.org.au
Website: www.intercultural.org.au

JCCV | ENGAGE | The Victorian Treaty Advancement Commission Roles & Aims | Monday 6 August 2018 | 8-9pm

[Edited extract from public address]

Join JCCV's upcoming Plenum: The Victorian Treaty Advancement Commission

A proud Gunditjmara woman, Jill Gallagher, AO, Commissioner is a highly respected Victorian Aboriginal leader who has dedicated her life to advocating for self-determination outcomes on behalf of the Victorian Aboriginal community. Jill commenced as Victorian Treaty Advancement Commissioner at the start of 2018.

Where: Lamm Jewish Library, 304 Hawthorn Road, Caulfield South, 3162.

Cost: FREE event.

Bookings: RSVP community@jccv.org.au

MORE:
The Jewish Community Council of Victoria (JCCV)
Address: Beth Weizmann Community Centre, 306 Hawthorn Road, Caulfield South, VIC 3162
Tel: 03 9272 5566
Email: community@jccv.org.au
Website: http://www.jccv.org.au

MIN | TOUR | Places of Worship | Wednesday 22 August 2018 | 9am-2pm

[Edited extract from public address]

All aboard the bus into friendship.

Bus departs 9:05am: Melton City Council car park, 232 High St, Melton VIC 3337
Bus drops off passengers at Caroline Springs Library at 1.45pm and Melton City Council at 2pm

Places of Worship:
9.15am-10.15am: The Baha'i Faith Teachings Incursion at Caroline Springs Library, 193-201 Caroline Springs Blvd, Caroline Springs, 3023
11am-1pm: Quang Minh Buddhist Temple, 18 Burke St, Braybrook VIC 3019 | Special Requirements: Take shoes off before entering the temple

Inclusions: Vegetarian Lunch provided by the Quang Minh Buddhist Temple

Cost: $5 donation to help with expenses

Bookings: RSVP Thursday 16 August 2018; Maria Email: mariascientologyvic@gmail.com, Tel: 0409 046 172, Tel:  0424 125 690

MORE:
Melton Interfaith Network (MIN)
Melton City Council
232 High St, Melton VIC 3337

COP | ANNOUNCES | Calls for reversal of asylum seeker income support cuts | 22 June 2018

[Edited extract from public address]

Port Phillip Council has marked Refugee Week by joining a national campaign calling on the Federal Government to reverse income support cuts to thousands of asylum seekers.

Councillor Ogy Simic, who successfully moved the notice of motion at this week’s Council meeting, said it was Council’s duty to try and stop vulnerable and often traumatised arrivals to Australia from joining the growing ranks of people experiencing homelessness.

“Refugee Week is a timely opportunity for us as a Council to say ‘enough is enough’ and join with other councils and organisations to advocate on this important issue for asylum seekers,” Cr Simic, who came to Australia as a refugee, said.

“Our City is a proud to be a Refugee Welcome Zone and we want to make it very clear that we believe this unfair policy must be overturned before more asylum seekers become hungry and homeless as they wait for their protection applications to stay in Australia to be assessed.”

Cr Simic said the local Brigidine Asylum Seeker Project, which supports people who have been detained in Immigration Detention Centres and asylum seekers living in the community, was concerned about the number of people already seeking help after being dropped from the federal Status Resolution Support Services (SRSS) program.

“These desperate people include a mother of four who had been deemed ‘job ready’ despite three of her children being too young to attend school,” he said.

Mayor Bernadene Voss said Council would take actions including:
  • asking the Prime Minister and Federal Minister of Home Affairs to reverse cuts to the SSRS program, and
  • informing local Victorian and federal MPs of Council’s position along with agencies and community groups assisting asylum seekers.
Background
The Federal Government’s national SSRS program provides a basic living allowance worth about $247 a week, usually 89 per cent of the Newstart Allowance, casework support and access to torture and trauma counselling. It is delivered by not-for-profit agencies.

In August 2017, the Home Affairs Department reduced those able to access the program, including people studying English for employment. As a result of a further eligibility change on 1 May 2018, SRSS asylum seeking recipients who are assessed as being job ready will start exiting the program. The Federal Government maintains the program is designed for short-term, tailored support and that asylum seekers who have work rights and are considered ‘job ready’ should be obliged to work.

MORE:
City of Port Phillip
Media Unit
Tel: 9209 6506
Email: mediaenquiries@portphillip.vic.gov.au
Website: http://www.portphillip.vic.gov.au/jun-2018-media_7613.htm

GEIFN | REPORTS | HCWPRLM | DIALOGUE | 38th WARP Office: Afterlife | Saturday 30 June 2018 | 4-6pm

[Report is compiled from multiple public addresses, multiple sources made over multiple publication dates]

Civic, Religious and Community Leaders and Guests assembled to address the questions Description of Heaven/Nirvana/Paradise according to Scripture/Teaching and Standard in order to enter Heaven/Nirvana/Paradise

On this occasion, a round-table discussion on the trustworthiness of Scripture was moderated by Steven Gouw and other contributors were from 3 forms of Christianity, Islam and Buddhism. With opportunities for questions and input from a growing audience.

The Buddhist programmed appearance was on behalf of Buddhist Council Victoria's Religious Instruction (bENGAGED) and Glen Eira Interfaith Network (GEIFN). There are many views, here is a reflected Buddhist account offered on the day and expanded post-event for a wider audience.

Description of Heaven/Nirvana/Paradise according to Scripture/Teaching

According to Buddhist teachings, each individual passes through many incarnations until the individual is liberated from worldly illusions, delusions and cravings. This is Nibbana/Nirvana/Enlightenment (Pali/Sanskrit/English).

Depending on tradition: 
  • description is an existence of beauty, abundance and peace, a realm where a Buddha resides, or a state of Mind.
  • location is considered a far away destination, within arm’s reach or between one’s ears.
  • timing to accomplish is considered to be measurable in 100 Kalpa (Sanskrit: lifetime of universes), 3 Kalpas or 1 lifetime, this lifetime.
Afterlife can be described in different ways. Here are 3 more:
  • Theravada: After individual bodily death, rebirth until Nibbana
  • Mahayana: Bodhisattva promise of delaying one’s Nirvana to be continually reborn to assist countless others liberate themselves from their Suffering
  • Vajrayana: Effortful striving here and now towards Enlightenment by freeing oneself from individual suffering. Least effort most benefit until including all beings. Because doing anything else just doesn’t make any sense any more.
After Life of the Buddha, came Symbols. Here are 6 more:
  • Stupa: The stupa represents the enlightened mind of the Buddha and represents the 5 purified elements - earth, water, fire, wind and ether (space).
  • Dharma Wheel: The Dharmachakra (Wheel of the Law) is an 8-spoked wheel that represents existence, ignorance, suffering, purposeful effort, overcoming obstacles and liberation from suffering.
  • Bodhi Tree/Leaf: The Bodhi tree is the tree under which Buddha received enlightenment.
  • Lotus Flower: The lotus flower (Padma) represents purification of body, speech and mind,since it grows in muddy waters yet blooms untainted above the surface of the water. A lotus in full bloom represents enlightenment.
  • Namaste: hands held in prayer pose indicating oneness with, or interconnectedness with all things in all times and places
  • Swastika: The Swastika is an ancient Indian symbol used to represent eternity, auspiciousness or the skilful means of identifying suffering and the deliverance from it. For Australia 2018 use, due to the symbol’s mis-use by Nazi Germany mid-1900s, general advice is not to use this in a public place in Australia without additional guidance/explanation.

Standard in order to enter Heaven/Nirvana/Paradise

"Just as treasures are uncovered from the earth, so virtue appears from good deeds, and wisdom appears from a pure and peaceful mind. To walk safely through the maze of human life, one needs the light of wisdom and the guidance of virtue.”
Buddha (563 BCE - 483 CE)
Each individual passes through many incarnations until the individual is liberated from worldly illusions, delusions and cravings. Breaking the circular loop of Dhukka/Samsara/Suffering (Pali/Sanskrit/English).

This liberation is known as the lasting Awakening/Realising of Nibbana/Nirvana/Enlightenment (Pali/Sanskrit/English); a blowing out of a flame of karmic tendencies.

Although each of the traditions may emphasise different entry points, methods and practice, one way to free oneself from the clutches of suffering is known as adopting, practising and adhering to The Four Noble Truths.

The Four Noble Truths
  1. Existence is suffering 
  2. Suffering is caused by ignorance (worldly illusions, delusions and cravings).
  3. There is an end to suffering
  4. There are many ways, The Noble Eightfold Path is the way of a Buddha: Awakened Mind.
The Noble Eightfold Path
  1. Right Understanding. Understanding life is always changing. Practice of letting go of attachments. Contentment leads to peace and happiness.
  2. Right Effort. Mindful, kind and positive thinking.
  3. Right Intention. Having helpful and positive feelings behind actions.
  4. Right Livelihood. Doing useful work that doesn’t harm others
  5. Right Mindfulness. Being mindful of thoughts, words and deeds and how they affect others.
  6. Right Speech. Speaking in a kind, thoughtful and helpful way.
  7. Right Action. Living an ethical life avoiding doing any harm.
  8. Right Meditation. Training the mind to be calm and positive in order to develop wisdom.
Supplementary:
From a Mahayana Buddhist View: 

From a Vajrayana view?:

This is part of an ongoing activity of Korean originated group Heavenly Culture, World Peace, Restoration of Light working diligently towards peace in the world. There concentrated efforts providing a safe space for divergent views to be shared, discussed and respectfully debated is a lovely example of actions peaking louder than words.

On behalf of BCV’s Buddhist Religious Instruction (bENGAGED), thankyou to Hosts, Organisers, Volunteers and Participants working to share, build collaborations, celebrate diversity and foster team approach to addressing today's society. Received with gratitude.

MORE:
Heavenly Culture, World Peace, Restoration of Light Melbourne (HCWPRL)
Tel: +61 434 281 446
Email: au@hwpl.kr
Website: www.hwpl.kr | www.peacelaw.org

GEIFN | REPORTS | CCYP | FORUM | Reportable Conduct Scheme - Interviewing Children | Thursday 5 July 2018 | 9.30am-4pm

[Report is compiled from multiple public addresses, multiple sources made over multiple publication dates]

A hosted forum on interviewing children during investigations under the reportable conduct scheme. The forum will consist of presentations from Dr Jenny Dwyer and Professor Martine Powell.

Dr Jenny Dwyer is an Accredited Mental Health Social Worker and an Approved Consultant and Certified Therapist in EMDR. She has worked in a range of specialist therapeutic services, including 17 years at the Bouverie Centre where she was the founding coordinator of the Sexual Abuse Treatment Team, developed and delivered curriculum for post graduate clinical training in family therapy and provided therapy to families with complex needs. Jenny presented understandings of the impact of trauma on children and adolescents and how this is relevant to investigations.

Martine Powell is Professor at Griffith University and Founding Director of the Centre for Investigative Interviewing. Prior to becoming a full-time academic, she worked as a psychologist in a child protection unit and a teacher. For the past 25 years, she has been conducting research on interviewing children and designing effective investigative interviewing programs. Martine provided an overview of what constitutes best practice investigative interviewing of children and adolescents, and how this can be achieved.

About the Reportable Conduct Scheme 
The Victorian Reportable Conduct Scheme requires some organisations to report allegations of child abuse and child-related misconduct made about their workers or volunteers to the Commission for Children and Young People.

The scheme aims to improve how organisations respond to allegations of child abuse and child- related misconduct.

Under the scheme:
  • organisations must respond to allegations of child abuse and child-related misconduct made against their workers and volunteers 
  • organisations must tell the Commission about allegations 
  • the Commission oversees how organisations respond to and investigate allegations 
  • organisations, regulators, the police, the Working With Children Check and the Commission share information. 
Organisations must still report any behaviour that may be criminal to police. If police are involved, organisations must still investigate, but only after police say it is OK to start.

What type of conduct is reportable?
  • sexual offences involving a child
  • sexual misconduct involving a child
  • physical violence involving a child
  • any behaviour that causes significant emotional or psychological harm to a child
  • significant neglect of a child.
A child includes anyone under 18 years of age.

For more information about types of reportable conduct, go to About the Reportable Conduct Scheme on the Commission’s website.

Who does the scheme apply to? 
The scheme can apply to the following people engaged in certain organisations:
  • employees 
  • volunteers
  • some contractors
  • office holders
  • ministers of religion
  • officers of a religious body.
For more information about organisations that are included, go to For organisations on the Commission’s website.

What are the organisations’ obligations? 
The head of an organisation is legally responsible for carrying out obligations under the scheme. The head of an organisation may be:

  • the Chief Executive Officer
  • the Principal Officer of the organisation
  • the Secretary, if the organisation is a Victorian Government Department.

If the organisation does not have a CEO, principal officer or equivalent, they can nominate one. The form for this is at Nominating a head of organisation on the Commission’s website.

The head of an organisation needs to:
  • take steps to keep children safe
  • make sure organisation has ways for a complaint or allegation to be made.
If it is unclear who is the head of your organisation, contact the Commission.

What must the head of an organisation do?
  • Notify: Notify the Commission within 3 business days of becoming aware of an allegation. 
  • Investigate: Investigate an allegation. Tell the Commission who is doing the investigation. Manage risks to children.
  • Update: Give the Commission a detailed update within 30 calendar days of becoming aware of an allegation. 
  • Outcomes: Tell the Commission about the result of the investigation, what the organisation will do next and why. 
It is a criminal offence for a head of an organisation to not comply with the 3 business day and 30 calendar day notification rules.

Resources and support
Reportable Conduct Scheme information sheets
Videos and presentations
Guides and information sheets
Translated information sheets
Helpful resources and organisations

An emphasis of a non-judgmental approach, open questioning and deep listening when a child wishes to disclose. The timing of the disclosure and the narrative is particular to the individual and situation.
If an interpreter is required, please call the Translating and Interpreting Service on 13 14 50 and ask them to contact the Commission for Children and Young People on 03 8601 5281.

On behalf of BCV’s Buddhist Religious Instruction (bENGAGED), thankyou to Hosts, Organisers, Volunteers and Participants working to uphold the trustworthiness of children-safe spaces. Received with gratitude.

MORE:
Commission for Children and Young People (CCYP)
Address: Level 18, 570 Bourke Street, Melbourne VIC 3000

Tel: (03) 8601 5281
Email: contact@ccyp.vic.gov.au
Website: www.ccyp.vic.gov.au

GEIFN | REPORTS | PPLS | TALK | Aunty Judith ‘Jacko’ Jackson: Because Of Her, We Can | Thursday 12 July 2018 | 6.30-7.30pm

[Report is compiled from multiple public addresses, multiple sources made over multiple publication dates]

A special NAIDOC conversation with guest Aunty Judith ‘Jacko’ Jackson and Alison Craigie-Parsons. 


  • Aunty Jacko, a Gunggari woman and elder, is regarded by many as the glue that binds the Aboriginal community in the City of Port Phillip. With wisdom gained from her own early struggles, she has helped make a difference to the health of many community members in Melbourne’s inner southern suburbs, earning universal respect and affection. Aunty Jacko has received a number of awards for her outstanding community work, including being inducted in the 2016 Victorian Aboriginal Honour Roll.
  • Alison Craigie-Parsons is a Gomeroi woman of Central New South Wales / Southern Queensland with over 20 years of experience in Indigenous health and higher education.



Where: St Kilda Library, 150 Carlisle St, St Kilda, VIC 3182

Better known as ‘Jacko’, Judy was born in Roma, Queensland to Gunggari man Edward an ex-serviceman who had served in Papua New Guinea during World War II, and Sri Lankan Indian Woman May Jackson (nee Fernando). The oldest of the 5 Jackson children, Judy had 6 older siblings from her mother’s first marriage. The conversation spanned a richly experienced lifetime, born into a Qld birth mixed-marriage, close encounters with sea-faring European men, subsequent childbirth, Stolen Wages, on the grog and being a Parkie.

Gunggari language is spoken in the Mitchell region of South-West Queensland and extends north to Morven and Mungallala, East towards Roma and South along the Maranoa River.

Stolen Wages was the policy where Aboriginals were placed as servants with landholder families, a minimum wage paid with eight-tenths withheld under the guise of forced saving. The forced savings were rarely returned to the individual. There

Parkies was the term for Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islanders displaced, disadvantaged and dispossessed. They did not choose to live in Cleve Gardens, but arrived there often as a last resort. It was a place where aboriginals could meet and catch up with the news of relatives and friends. The park had even won official recognition as an aboriginal meeting place by being listed in the Aboriginal Historic Places Register. In 1994, Cleve Gardens toilet block's demolition saw the destruction of a modern sacred meeting place for the Koori people who gathered there. The toilet was painted with the Koori (aboriginal) flag.

Aunty Jacko described how being on the road taught her all many life lessons, quipping it made her a Roads Scholar. Arriving in Melbourne from a different mob was frequently told to go home. The Maoris and Islander expats proved to be more welcoming.

Her mother and elder brothers played influential roles at various times in removing her first born from her custody. Her first born was on his way back to Queensland, dying prematurely due to a drug overdose in his early 20s, leaving a daughter.

With health failing, Aunty Jacko decided to give up the grog and do something different.

Wominjeka community barbecues
Initially a client then a volunteer, Judy encouraged Inner South Community Health (ISCH) to adopt new approaches to reach out to the ‘parkies’.

Aunty Jacko always remembered that the St Kilda ‘parkies’ had befriended her when she first arrived in Melbourne in 1967. Many were homeless Aboriginal people who gathered daily in the public gardens near Fitzroy Street.

Taking ISCH committee meetings to the park and at Parkies’ request, offering a weekly barbecue supported by the City of Port Phillip. With Council funding, ISCH auspiced what became known as the Wominjeka community barbecue for homeless people. Now in its 13th year the barbecue enables health workers and other service providers to meet informally with community members to tackle issues such as housing or accessing social support. Originally in the 60s, the number of ‘parkies’ has come down from 30 or 40 to just a handful. A result of a concerted team spirit and client centred approach.

Share a meal and a yarn
Judy was also instrumental in initiating fortnightly lunches at ISCH’s Our Rainbow Place, where the local Aboriginal community get together to share a meal and a yarn. For 18 years Judy has shopped and prepared food for the lunches in her own home, promoting healthy food and encouraging community members to keep in touch with each other.

In 2009 she helped run a possum skin cloak workshop led by well-known artist Vicky Couzens for residents of the Winja Ulupna Drug and Alcohol Recovery Centre for women. The participants designed panels for the cloak while discussing ways of preventing cervical cancer. The cloak now hangs in ISCH’s foyer in St Kilda.

Judy has also participated in an ISCH documentary to help local Aboriginal people tackle smoking issues. The documentary, Smoke Free and Deadly, was shortlisted for a 2016 VicHealth award.

With permission from Boonwurrung Elder, Caroline Briggs, Judy performs Acknowledgements to Country at events within the City of Port Phillip when no Boonwurrung Elder is available. She is often asked to raise the Aboriginal flag at official council or agency functions. Judy is also a long-standing member of the Urban South Local Aboriginal Network.

After years of community work, Judy has also put her practical experience into formal study. At the age of 60 she gained a Certificate IV in Community Development. She looks forward to the day that the next generation of Indigenous women to step up to take the baton from her.

On behalf of Buddhist Council of Victoria’s bENGAGED and Glen Eira Interfaith Network (GEIFN), thankyou to Hosts, Organisers, Volunteers and Participants working to share, build collaborations, celebrate diversity and foster team approach to addressing today's society. Received with gratitude.


MORE:
Port Phillip Library Service (PPLS)
City of Port Phillip Council
Tel: 9209 6655
Email: library@portphillip.vic.gov.au
Website: https://library.portphillip.vic.gov.au/Home

CCYP | FORUM | Reportable Conduct Scheme: Interviewing Children | Thursday 5 July 2018 | 9.30am-4pm

[Edited extract from public address]

A forum on interviewing children during investigations under the reportable conduct scheme. The forum will consist of presentations from Dr Jenny Dwyer and Professor Martine Powell.

Dr Jenny Dwyer is an Accredited Mental Health Social Worker and an Approved Consultant and Certified Therapist in EMDR. She has worked in a range of specialist therapeutic services, including 17 years at the Bouverie Centre where she was the founding coordinator of the Sexual Abuse Treatment Team, developed and delivered curriculum for post graduate clinical training in family therapy and provided therapy to families with complex needs. Jenny will present on understanding the impact of trauma on children and adolescents and how this is relevant to investigations.

Martine Powell is Professor at Griffith University and Founding Director of the Centre for Investigative Interviewing. Prior to becoming a full-time academic, she worked as a psychologist in a child protection unit and a teacher. For the past 25 years, she has been conducting research on interviewing children and designing effective investigative interviewing programs. Martine will provide an overview of what constitutes best practice investigative interviewing of children and adolescents, and how this can be achieved.

Where: Jasper Hotel, 489 Elizabeth Street, Melbourne VIC 3000

Inclusions: Morning/afternoon tea and lunch will be provided.

Considerations: Paid parking is located at 58 Franklin Street.

Bookings: Tickets are limited to 2 per organisation. If you have any dietary requirements, please inform the Commission. Online through EventBrite

MORE:
Commission for Children and Young People
Mail: Level 18, 570 Bourke Street, Melbourne Victoria 3000
Tel: 1300 78 29 78
Email: childsafe@ccyp.vic.gov.au
Website: https://ccyp.vic.gov.au

WIN | INTRODUCING | Wayapa and Aboriginal Spirituality | Saturday 7 July 2018 | 10am to 12pm

[Edited extract from public address]

An introduction to Aboriginal Spiritual connection with the environment. 

Wayapa combines mindfulness, traditional Aboriginal movements and a narrative meditation in a series of 14 elements to teach participants the importance of connecting into the earth and nature for holistic wellness.

Where: The Function Room 1st Floor Wyndham Community & Education Centre, 20 Synott Street, Werribee, VIC 3030

Bookings: Register online through Trybooking.

MORE:
Wyndham Interfaith Network
Laurence Gray
Tel: 0401 337 696
Email: laurenceg@wyndhamcec.org.au

PPLS | TALK | Aunty Judith ‘Jacko’ Jackson: Because Of Her, We Can | Thursday 12 July 2018 | 6.30-7.30pm

[Edited extract from public address]

Listen in to this special NAIDOC conversation with guest Aunty Judith ‘Jacko’ Jackson and Alison Craigie-Parsons. 

Aunty Jacko, a Gunggari woman and elder, is regarded by many as the glue that binds the Aboriginal community in the City of Port Phillip. With wisdom gained from her own early struggles, she has helped make a difference to the health of many community members in Melbourne’s inner southern suburbs, earning universal respect and affection. Aunty Jacko has received a number of awards for her outstanding community work, including being inducted in the 2016 Victorian Aboriginal Honour Roll.

Alison Craigie-Parsons is a proud Aboriginal woman of the Gomeroi people of Central New South Wales / Southern Queensland with over 20 years of experience in Indigenous health and higher education.

Where: St Kilda Library, 150 Carlisle St, St Kilda, VIC 3182

Cost: Free


More NAIDOC Week events in Port Phillip: http://www.portphillip.vic.gov.au/naidoc-week.htm

MORE:
City of Port Phillip Council
Port Phillip Library Service (PPLS)
Tel: 9209 6655
Email: library@portphillip.vic.gov.au
Website: https://library.portphillip.vic.gov.au/Home

KIN | TALK | Coming together as Young People of Faith working towards Tolerance and Unity | Thursday 26 July 2018 | 7-9pm

[Edited extract from public address]

Interfaith dialogue has become essential in order to help more people discover, celebrate and promote the reality of pluralism in our community. 

It is important that people respect and have appreciation for other’s faith traditions. Promoting interfaith dialogue among young Kingston Committee hopes to build relationships, identify commonly-held beliefs and enhance the participants’ own faith experience.

Kingston Council supports meaningful interfaith dialogue, while recognizing the integrity of our individual faiths. Kingston Interfaith Network Committee has been established by Council to provide a conduit between Kingston Council and the Faith communities within local areas to encourage open communication, interfaith dialogue and partnerships to address the needs of the local communities.

This event will be facilitated by Committee members who will organize the presentation of the panel, introduce panellists, help with time management, and facilitate an effective discussion of the topic with members of the audience. Panellists from the following faiths: Islam, Judaism, Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, Catholic and Hare Krishna.

Where: Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, 2 Barbara St, Moorabbin VIC 3189

Inclusions: Refreshments will be provided. All are welcome.

Cost: Free

Bookings: RSVP: Friday 20 July 2018 to Elisabetta Robecchi, tel: 03 9581 4783, Email: elisabetta.robecchi@kingston.vic.gov.au

MORE:
Kingston Interfaith Network
Kingston Council
Elisabetta Robecchi
Tel: 03 9581 4783
Email: elisabetta.robecchi@kingston.vic.gov.au

BMIN | FORUM | The Gift of Life | Saturday 4 August 2018 | 2-5.30pm

[Edited extract from public address]

A forum aiming to raise faith and religious communities awareness of the benefits of donating organs to save (or relieve) sick people who are suffering due to the malfunction of their own organs.

In this forum, members of the Brimbank Maribyrnong Interfaith Network and Donate Life Victoria will present their view of organ and tissue donation. Short presentations will be will be given from the perspective of:
  • Buddhist - Ven Phuoc Tan of Quang Minh Temple 
  • Christian Faith - Ray Gorman, Uniting Church, Sunshine 
  • Sikh Faith - Kawal Singh, Sikh Interfaith Council 
  • Salvation Army - Colin Reynolds, Salvation Army Sunshine
  • Muslim faith - Nayran Tabiei, community leader 
The event will also include speakers from Donate Life Victoria.

Where: Avalokitesvara Yuan Tong Monastery; 270 Hampshire Road, Sunshine

Cost: This is a free community event

Inclusions: light refreshments.

Bookings: Online through EventBrite

MORE:
The Brimbank and Maribyrnong Interfaith Network
Maribyrnong City Council
Tel: (03) 9688 0452
Email: info@bmin.org.au
Website: http://www.bmin.org.au

VMC | GRANTING | Multicultural Community Infrastructure Fund | now OPEN

[Edited extract from public address]

Culturally diverse community groups, organisations and regionally based associations are encouraged to apply for projects that build new facilities, improve or restore existing infrastructure, or increase security and improve accessibility for communities.

The Victorian Government is inviting applications for its new $9.5 million Multicultural Community Infrastructure Fund. The new funding stream will offer large and small grants to support projects commencing in the 2018-19 financial year.

This includes an opportunity for community groups to apply for up to $10,000 towards the purchase or upgrade of depreciating assets such as fridges and microwaves.

How much?
There are two streams of funding available:
  • Small - Requests between $500 - $100,000 will be considered for minor fitouts or upgrades to existing community facilities.
  • Large - Requests between $100,001 - $750,000 will be considered for major upgrades of existing facilities or towards the construction of new facilities.
Who?
To be eligible for funding, an organisation must:
  • Be a not-for-profit entity registered under the Corporations Act 2001 (Cth) or the Associations Incorporation Reform Act 2012 (Vic)
  • Have a current Australian Business Number (ABN)
When?
Applications close 11.59pm, Friday 22 February 2019.
Applications and expressions of interest can be submitted at any time allowing organisations to undertake sufficient planning of their projects.

Where?
Find out more about the program and eligibility, or make an application at multicultural.vic.gov.au.

MORE:
Victorian Multicultural Commission
Level 9, 1 Spring St, Melbourne VIC 3000
Tel: (03) 7017 8171
Website: multicultural.vic.gov.au

PWR | ENDORSES | An Unequivocal Condemnation of Family Separation | 23 June 2018

[Edited extract from public address]

The Universal Declaration of Human Rights, essential to protecting the integrity of human beings within the family of nations, reminds us that “no one shall be subjected to torture or to cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment.” 

History teaches us that this cruelty is at its worst when it is rationalized by leadership, justified by law, and made defensible by appeals to sacred writings. The voices of the many are responsible to speak out against such aberration from our shared humanity, wherever in the world it is found. Silence and inaction equate to complicity.

When a nation claims the mantle of self-evident truths “under God”, it bears a special responsibility to act in accordance with these truths under divine precept. And when a nation is made up of a multitude of families, each with their religious traditions, philosophies, and ethical beliefs, that nation bears a further responsibility to uphold the freedoms that families require to flourish.

As a global organization dedicated to convening and connecting families of faith and conscience around the world, The Parliament of the World’s Religions sees the United States’ recent family separation policy, which has led to the fracture of vulnerable refugee families, as an abject failure of civilized and collective life. This was a failure of leadership, a failure of policy, a failure to understand sacred texts that call for the protection of the neighbor, a failure to regard the physical and mental health of children and parents, and a colossal failure of the heart.

Communities of faith and conscience must nurture families, in the many forms they take, and protect them by first opposing the leaders, policies, and reprehensible distortions of scripture that threaten their future.

The Parliament of the World’s Religions denounces these and likeminded global policies against families, and calls for all religions with which these leaders are affiliated to admonish them for their actions, and to refute any religious or scriptural justification to which they appeal in their effort to rationalize or justify those actions.

The damage already inflicted to immigrants, refugees and asylum seekers is extensive. While separation may have ceased, there is no infrastructure currently in place to track, locate, or return the children who have already been separated from their parents. There is still much repair to be done.
But where government fails, passionate communities of faith, conscience, and people everywhere of goodwill, must strive together toward a world of justice and compassion. We ask that you strive with us by doing the following:
Add your voice:
Tweet, tag, and share across social media and e-mail networks using the hashtags #KeepFamiliesTogether, #EndFamilySeparation.
Read and share the Universal Declaration of Human Rights:
  • Article 13.1 - Everyone has the right to freedom of movement and residence within the borders of each state. 
  • Article 14.1 - Everyone has the right to seek and enjoy in other countries asylum from persecution.
  • Article 25.2 - Motherhood and childhood are entitled to special care and assistance. All children, whether born in or out of wedlock, shall enjoy the same social protection.
Share Toward A Global Ethic: An Initial Declaration of the Parliament of the World's Religions:
  • Directive 3b. - Commitment to a Culture of Tolerance and a Life of Truthfulness:
    For the leaders of countries, politicians, and political parties, to whom we entrust our own freedoms. When they lie in the faces of their people, when they manipulate the truth, or when they are guilty of venality or ruthlessness in domestic or foreign affairs, they forsake their credibility and deserve to lose their offices and their voters. Conversely, public opinion should support those politicians who dare to speak the truth to the people at all times. 
Identify those in your community who might be at risk and check in on them. Open your homes to those in need.

Encourage your place of worship to become a place of sanctuary.

Read and share the statement on family separation from your own community of faith and/or conscience, and take steps to ensure that your own religious, spiritual and ethical leaders and congregations are upholding and enacting its values.

Create a rapid response team within your community, and reach out to other communities of faith and conscience in your locale to create a network of assistance to support refugees and separated children.

Attend a "Families Belong Together" event in your community. Find a local event at FamiliesBelongTogether.org to find an event near you or create an event in your area!

PWR Champions of Change | Toronto Ontario | 1- 7 November 2018 Register

Help us to do good. Make a Gift to the Parliament


MORE:
Parliament of the World's Religions
Address: 70 East Lake Street, Suite 205, Chicago, IL 60601
Website: https://parliamentofreligions.org/



GEIFN | MEDIA | Mix | July 2018

MEDIA WORDS
Approx 5 min reads

Intro
Nicole Mowbray explores how 1-sided perception and habitual reaction determines unwanted outcomes when playing “Game of moans: Can one of these tactics stop constant arguing?” via The Brisbane Times
https://www.brisbanetimes.com.au/lifestyle/life-and-relationships/game-of-moans-can-one-of-these-tactics-stop-constant-arguing-20180607-p4zjza.html

Henrietta Cook explores the value of experienced referees, impartial umpires and student-focus to improve score cards of impaired educational playing fields, becoming “Handy in a crisis: Meet the man who's resolving Victoria's most toxic school disputes” via The Age
https://www.theage.com.au/national/victoria/meet-the-man-who-s-resolving-victoria-s-most-toxic-school-disputes-20180615-p4zlmf.html

Liam Mannix explores how science reveals how perception is different to reality, and anticipation of reward/punishment of a witness influences outcome, revealing how this “Brain study shows you like hot chips even if you believe you don't” via The Canberra Times
https://www.canberratimes.com.au/national/brain-study-shows-you-like-hot-chips-even-if-you-believe-you-don-t-20180614-p4zli6.html


Intra
Peter Hannam explores over lunch many reasons why “Climate activist Bill McKibben still fighting 'The End of Nature'” via The Sydney Morning Herald
https://www.smh.com.au/environment/climate-change/climate-activist-bill-mckibben-still-fighting-the-end-of-nature-20180605-p4zjhd.html

Benjamin Law explores individual existence, contribution to society, branches of nature and unvarnished pages of history, rolling with “Dicey Topics: Bob Carr talks politics, death and religion” via The Brisbane Times
https://www.brisbanetimes.com.au/politics/nsw/dicey-topics-bob-carr-talks-politics-death-and-religion-20180618-p4zm68.html

Jennifer Johnston explores a modern couple  working love, life and meaningful legacy, revealing why there are “Two of Us: they both work in cemeteries – but not together” via The Sydney Morning Herald
https://www.smh.com.au/national/queensland/two-of-us-they-both-work-in-cemeteries-but-not-together-20180619-p4zmc7.html


Inter
Nassim Khadem explores connections between incentive, freedom and purposeful living, reasoning “A universal basic income isn't the immediate solution to technological disruption” via WA Today
https://www.watoday.com.au/money/planning-and-budgeting/robots-might-take-our-jobs-but-free-money-is-not-the-immediate-answer-20180606-p4zjwz.html

Jessica Irvine explores statistics, job prospects and youthful entry, revealing “Young and out; Australia's hidden scourge of youth unemployment” via WA Today
https://www.watoday.com.au/business/the-economy/young-and-out-australia-s-hidden-scourge-of-youth-unemployment-20180622-p4zn4k.html

Jessica Irvine explores rigors of new parenting, mutual responsibility and collective benefits, arguing “It takes a village to raise a child but the village is missing” via The Canberra Times
https://www.canberratimes.com.au/business/the-economy/it-takes-a-village-to-raise-a-child-but-the-village-is-missing-20180624-p4zned.html


Multi
Brian Johnston explores time worn value in long arduous personal journeys toward societal spiritual enrichment, citing “The 10 most spectacular mountain monasteries” via Traveller.com.au
http://www.traveller.com.au/higher-ground-ten-dontmiss-mountain-monasteries-h10zbu

Kate Jones explores examples of small businesses thinking outside the box resulting in increased business opportunities when “Schooling future customers” via The Canberra Times
https://www.canberratimes.com.au/business/small-business/schooling-future-customers-20180621-p4zmz1.html

Robert Nelson explores time, motion and evolving artistic interpretation of self, world and relationships, arguing why “Painting is the hero of modernism, but MoMA at NGV reveals many delights” via The Sydney Morning Herald
https://www.smh.com.au/entertainment/art-and-design/painting-is-the-hero-of-modernism-but-moma-at-ngv-reveals-many-delights-20180611-h11918.html


All
Peter Martin explores how changing societal values and entrenched gender earning disparity could be rebalanced through taxation “Pink tax versus blue tax: the case for taxing women lightly” via The Canberra Times
https://www.canberratimes.com.au/politics/federal/pink-tax-versus-blue-tax-the-case-for-taxing-women-lightly-20180613-p4zl34.html

Jemima Lewis explores the challenges of a major modern major playing field, when discussing “Taking away kids' phones: 'the best thing that could ever happen'?” via WA Today
https://www.watoday.com.au/lifestyle/life-and-relationships/taking-away-kids-phones-the-best-thing-that-could-ever-happen-20180616-p4zlv4.html

Benjamin Law interviews former pop star turned pragmatic scientist, shining the spotlight on “Dicey Topics: Professor Brian Cox talks money, politics and bodies” via The Sydney Morning Herald
https://www.smh.com.au/entertainment/tv-and-radio/dicey-topics-professor-brian-cox-talks-money-politics-and-bodies-20180611-p4zkr6.html


Togather
Benjamin Preiss explores an example of rituals, creating opportunities for realising individual experience, fasting and community connectiveness with renewed enthusiasm, celebrating how “'It's crazy': Baker brothers work overtime as long fast ends in feast” via The Age
https://www.theage.com.au/national/victoria/it-s-crazy-baker-brothers-work-overtime-as-long-fast-ends-in-feast-20180615-p4zlpb.html

Michael Lallo explores a grass-roots passion uniting divides, fostering acceptance of difference - showing how it’s publicly possible when “Alienated from AFL, these fans built their own footy community” via The Sydney Morning Herald
https://www.smh.com.au/entertainment/tv-and-radio/alienated-from-afl-these-fans-built-their-own-footy-community-20180621-p4zmuw.html

Carolyn Webb explores an example of the restorative value of community-led solutions to disenfranchising when “Rockdogs claim Reclink win with blind coach at annual Community Cup” via The Sydney Morning Herald
https://www.smh.com.au/national/victoria/rockdogs-claim-reclink-win-with-blind-coach-at-annual-community-cup-20180624-p4zng5.html


Nobly
Tim Barlass explores a time-honored way to civilized expression of personal self-acceptance, resolve differences, display skilful team work, provide opportunities to improve and celebrate diversity by setting fair rules of engagement, in this small tale of “Socceroos facing up to the French challenge” via WA Today
https://www.watoday.com.au/national/socceroos-facing-up-to-the-french-challenge-20180614-p4zlhc.html

Carolyn Webb explores new-school solution to reconnecting individuals with their community old-school style, revealing the silent seduction of “The libraries opening late as a pokies alternative” via The Sydney Morning Herald
https://www.smh.com.au/national/victoria/the-libraries-opening-late-as-a-pokies-alternative-20180617-p4zlzc.html

Carolyn Webb explores the value of mindfulness, access to opportunity and community spirit, when citing this experiment asking customers to “Forget the price tag: ‘pay what you feel’ that tomato is worth” via The Age
https://www.theage.com.au/national/victoria/forget-the-price-tag-pay-what-you-feel-that-tomato-is-worth-20180621-p4zmwm.html


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TED TALKS
Approx 20min presentations

Victor Rios: Help for kids the education system ignores

Macinley Butson: A young inventor uses the past to change the future

Katlego Kolanyane-Kesupile: How I'm bringing queer pride to my rural village


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GUEST SINGS
Approx 5 min presentation

Norah Jones - Come Away With Me
https://youtu.be/lbjZPFBD6JU


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STREET JIVES
Approx 2 min presentation

Sesame Street with Jason Mraz: Outdoors
http://youtu.be/ZrqF7yD10Bo


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WISDOM RECONCILES
Approx 30 min presentation

Where Are You Really From? Season 1 Episode 1 (30 mins)
Australia's Bendigo
The Chinese migrated to regional Victoria in the late 1800s. In search of gold, instead they often found persecution and violence. Today, Bendigo is a city of contrasts and one that is trying to reconcile its past. The few descendants of those early Chinese settlers that remain in the town are each trying to rediscover a side of their history that was too often seen as shameful. For Michael Hing, the experience is a personal one. His ancestors settled in regional New South Wales, but they just as easily could have called Bendigo home.
https://www.sbs.com.au/ondemand/video/1242022467960/where-are-you-really-from